Monday, July 28, 2014

First Big Train Home Playoff Game TOMORROW! BT Wins Montgomery Cup

TOMORROWFirst Playoff Game!


To make sure that you are up to date with the schedule for the CRCBL Playoffs, visit www.CalRipkenLeague.org andwww.BigTrain.org frequently. 

The seeds for the 2014 League Championship Series are as follows:

#1 - BETHESDA BIG TRAIN
#2 - Baltimore Redbirds
#3 - Rockville Express
#4 - Gaithersburg Giants
#5 - Alexandria Aces
#6 - Youse's Orioles

The Express will host the Orioles at 7:00 and the Giants will host the Aces at 7:00 today.  Both games will be single elimination. 

After the winners of today's games are decided, the teams will be re-seeded and the Big Train will host the lowest remaining team while the Redbirds will host the higher seed. Both of those games will take place Tuesday night. 

On Wednesday, the winners of the two Tuesday games will play each other while the losers will match up as well.  Both games will be played at the higher seeded team.  By virtue of the Big Train's #1 seed, this guarantees a Wednesday night home game as well. 

Tickets to both games can be purchased here or at the gate. 
Final Montgomery Cup Results 

The Bethesda Big Train team has won the 2014 Montgomery Cup.  The winner of the Montgomery Cup is the team with the best record in regular season head-to-head competition among the four Montgomery County teams in the Cal Ripken Collegiate Summer Baseball League.  The Montgomery Cup is sponsored by the Gazette newspapers.   The Gazette also provided advertising and made donations to all four of the teams.

With this victory, the Big Train team has either won the Montgomery Cup or shared first place in nine out of the past ten seasons.

The final standings for the 2014 Montgomery Cup competition are as follows:

 

 

2014 CRCBL Standings 
 
TEAM
W
L
%
GB
BIG TRAIN 
31
9
.775
 -
Baltimore Redbirds
25
15
.625
6
Rockville Express
24
16
.600
7
Gaithersburg Giants
23
17
.575
8
Alexandria Aces
23
17
.575
8
Youse's Orioles
18
22
.450
13
Vienna River Dogs
12
22
.450
13
FCA Herndon Braves
17
23
.425
14
D.C. Grays
15
25
.375
16
Baltimore Dodgers
13
27
.325
18
SS-Takoma TBolts
13
27
.325
18

Saturday, July 26, 2014

The Fat Burning Secrets of Celebrity Personal Trainers


10 Rules of Fat Loss
From the Desk of Joseph Arangio
Founder and CEO
PEAK Strength & Conditioning, LLC
Affiliated with US Sports Strength& Conditioning


I'm Joseph Arangio and I'm glad you took the time to read this.
Since 1996, I've been sharing the benefits of smart workouts, portion-controlled eating, managing stress, having a winning mindset, and getting enough sleep.
Technically, I've been interested in this stuff since middle school when my dad introduced me to exercise as a way to get in shape for athletics.
Nowadays my company does a few things in the health and fitness industry...
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Friday, July 25, 2014

Pumping Iron Cuts Football Injury Severity

No secret here and this is one we have posted before, but always worth another look:

 
Lifting weights may be the key to preventing severe injuries to football players, according to a three-year study of high school athletes in Florida.
The study found 78% of severe injuries to the upper body, especially shoulder separations, occurred among football players not involved in a strength-training program of controlled weight lifting. In addition, 64% of those with severe injuries to the lower body, including knee injuries, also were athletes not involved in the training program.
"These are very significant numbers," said Dr. MaryBeth Horodyski, assistant professor of exercise and sports sciences at the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. "The bottom line is, those kids who did strength training typically did not have as severe injuries. They more often had mild or moderate injuries."
The study involving teams at 13 high schools turned up 887 injuries among football players. Mild injuries were defined as those which kept players out of practice or a game for seven days or less. Downtime for moderate injuries was 7 to 21 days, and severe injuries included those that kept players out of action for more than 21 days.
Roughly one third of the players in the study sustained injuries. However, Horodyski said that she and the team of athletic trainers and doctors assigned to the study were not surprised by that figure. According to national statistics, some type of injuries occur in 25% to 50% of athletes playing football during a given year, she points out.
The Florida study found defensive linemen are the most frequently injured players, and the most common type of injury for all positions is a sprain.
Fewer injuries were recorded during spring football, probably because it is less intense than fall play, the researcher said.
"The take-home message for coaches is, they need to implement a well-structured strength-training program for their players throughout the entire season," Horodyski stated. "It won't cut down on the total number of injuries, but time-loss goes down drastically if the injuries are not severe."
Source: Stroke

Thursday, July 24, 2014

What Athletes Eat To Win


                                                      
 
Three top athletes  a professional basketball player, a triathlete and a rodeo clown  reveal the dietary regimens they say help them maintain peak performance.
Eric Snow
Professional Basketball Player
I try to be conscious of my diet partly because I can't knock off the pounds as easily as when I was younger and partly because you don't want to be too full playing in the NBA.
Some guys eat whatever they want, but I stick to a fairly consistent regimen: On game days, breakfast consists of a bagel or some toast and a piece of fruit; when we don't have a game, I might have a bigger breakfast such as pancakes. But if I eat a really big breakfast on game days, it throws me off: I might be full until 4 p.m., so I'll skip lunch and can't eat because it's too close to game time.
Lunch is usually my big meal, some pasta or chicken. On game days, that's all I have until after the game. Then, I might eat something like a turkey sandwich or a salad, something just to tide me over. I'm usually not hungry after a game and don't want to eat a heavy meal before going to sleep. I may splurge on ice cream, but that's pretty much it for junk food. And I never eat pork or beef. Before I was in the NBA, I ate a lot more food and still felt hungry. Now, I feel satisfied.
My biggest concentration for competing is to drink enough. I drink four 32-ounce glasses of water or Gatorade throughout the day, including one at every meal. That's the real key  drinking enough. Eric Snow is the starting point guard for the Philadelphia 76ers.

Doug Stern
Triathelete
How and what I eat before exercise depends on many factors, the distance or duration of a race or workout, how long I've been training, the weather, but one thing always is constant: fluid intake, which is 8 ounces every hour throughout the day. During intense exercise, you can sweat as much as 8 ounces every 20 minutes.
When I was competing, I trained about two to three hours a day, and I would lose about 8 ounces of sweat every 20 minutes or so. To keep myself hydrated, I would drink gallons of water mixed with powdered vitamin C and electrolytes throughout the day. But during competition, I, as well as many other triathletes, drank a mixture of water and flat cola, which we mixed beforehand. We did this because the cola contains caffeine to keep you up, and it is easily digested.
My competition diet was high-carb and healthful, but I've always focused more on when I eat than what I eat. If a race were on Saturday, I would' carbo-load, fromWednesday on by keeping my meals constant but decreasing my activity level. That means a breakfast of cereal and fruit; lunch consists of pasta or a bagel and vegetables; and dinner contains meat or chicken for protein. The night before a race, I would have a big lunch and a very small dinner, if at all, to keep my bowels fairly empty. The morning of a race, I would only have coffee and cereal at least 1 hours before the start of the race.
Doug Stern has competed in nearly 40 triathlons, a race consisting of a 2.4-mile swim, 18-mile run and 50-mile bike race. He wrote a training column for Triathlete magazine and currently teaches swimming in New York City.
Paul Bonds
Rodeo Bullfighter
As a rodeo clown, my job is to protect the cowboy  to distract a raging bull long enough for the cowboy to get away. It's tough and dangerous work, and you have to be in top physical condition. A rodeo cowboy has to last eight seconds on a bull whose mission is to throw him, but I'm out there working for that eight seconds, the next eight seconds, the next eight seconds one cowboy after another, for the entire night.

What Athletes Eat To Win


                                                      
 
Three top athletes  a professional basketball player, a triathlete and a rodeo clown  reveal the dietary regimens they say help them maintain peak performance.
Eric Snow
Professional Basketball Player
I try to be conscious of my diet partly because I can't knock off the pounds as easily as when I was younger and partly because you don't want to be too full playing in the NBA.
Some guys eat whatever they want, but I stick to a fairly consistent regimen: On game days, breakfast consists of a bagel or some toast and a piece of fruit; when we don't have a game, I might have a bigger breakfast such as pancakes. But if I eat a really big breakfast on game days, it throws me off: I might be full until 4 p.m., so I'll skip lunch and can't eat because it's too close to game time.
Lunch is usually my big meal, some pasta or chicken. On game days, that's all I have until after the game. Then, I might eat something like a turkey sandwich or a salad, something just to tide me over. I'm usually not hungry after a game and don't want to eat a heavy meal before going to sleep. I may splurge on ice cream, but that's pretty much it for junk food. And I never eat pork or beef. Before I was in the NBA, I ate a lot more food and still felt hungry. Now, I feel satisfied.
My biggest concentration for competing is to drink enough. I drink four 32-ounce glasses of water or Gatorade throughout the day, including one at every meal. That's the real key  drinking enough. Eric Snow is the starting point guard for the Philadelphia 76ers.

Doug Stern
Triathelete
How and what I eat before exercise depends on many factors, the distance or duration of a race or workout, how long I've been training, the weather, but one thing always is constant: fluid intake, which is 8 ounces every hour throughout the day. During intense exercise, you can sweat as much as 8 ounces every 20 minutes.
When I was competing, I trained about two to three hours a day, and I would lose about 8 ounces of sweat every 20 minutes or so. To keep myself hydrated, I would drink gallons of water mixed with powdered vitamin C and electrolytes throughout the day. But during competition, I, as well as many other triathletes, drank a mixture of water and flat cola, which we mixed beforehand. We did this because the cola contains caffeine to keep you up, and it is easily digested.
My competition diet was high-carb and healthful, but I've always focused more on when I eat than what I eat. If a race were on Saturday, I would' carbo-load, fromWednesday on by keeping my meals constant but decreasing my activity level. That means a breakfast of cereal and fruit; lunch consists of pasta or a bagel and vegetables; and dinner contains meat or chicken for protein. The night before a race, I would have a big lunch and a very small dinner, if at all, to keep my bowels fairly empty. The morning of a race, I would only have coffee and cereal at least 1 hours before the start of the race.
Doug Stern has competed in nearly 40 triathlons, a race consisting of a 2.4-mile swim, 18-mile run and 50-mile bike race. He wrote a training column for Triathlete magazine and currently teaches swimming in New York City.
Paul Bonds
Rodeo Bullfighter
As a rodeo clown, my job is to protect the cowboy  to distract a raging bull long enough for the cowboy to get away. It's tough and dangerous work, and you have to be in top physical condition. A rodeo cowboy has to last eight seconds on a bull whose mission is to throw him, but I'm out there working for that eight seconds, the next eight seconds, the next eight seconds one cowboy after another, for the entire night.

LEE, BROWN, DIAZ-AVILES AND McDANIEL VOTED PRESEASON ALL-CIAA

Bowie State Bulldogs Picked to Finish 6th in Conference Play


DURHAM, N.C. - The Bowie State University football team has been predicted to finish 6th in the CIAA and 3rd in the Northern Division according to the 2014 conference preseason poll, which was released during the league's football press conference at the Durham Convention Center.

The Bulldogs return 42 lettermen including 14 starters from last year's squad. Bowie State finished the 2013 campaign with a 5-5 overall record and 3-4 record in the CIAA.

Seniors Khari Lee (TE - Baltimore, Md.), Keith Brown (RB – Temple Hills, Md.), Mario Diaz-Aviles (PK – Washington, D.C.) and Anthony McDaniel (DL – Fort Washington, Md.) were selected to the 2014 All-CIAA Preseason Team. The conference Predicted Order of Finish and Preseason Team are voted on by the CIAA Football Coaches Association.

For the third consecutive year, the defending CIAA Champions of Winston-Salem State University were selected to finish as the top team in the conference in 2014 followed by Fayetteville State University, Virginia State University, Shaw University and Elizabeth City State University made up the top five teams. Bowie State was voted as the sixth overall ranked team in the conference followed by Johnson C. Smith University, Chowan University, Saint Augustine’s University, Virginia Union University, Livingstone College and Lincoln (Pa.).

Bowie State will open up the season on September 6th, hosting the Saint Anselm College Hawks of Manchester, N.H. at 1 pm. St. Anselm is a member of the Northeast-10 Conference and finished the 2013 season with an overall record of 2-9 (1-7 in the conference). The Bulldogs captured a 42-28 victory in last years’ season opener on the Hawks home field.

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